Monday, 13 November 2017

One year into my Training Contract with GHS!


Kagowa Kuruneri of Garden House Solicitors Hertford Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
It doesn’t seem like too long has passed since I started training, but looking back on the year, it is definitely evident! 

Although it has been gone by quickly, it has been a fun and memorable year. That said, the most rewarding experiences I have had have been bringing cases to conclusion and receiving positive and encouraging feedback from my clients. It has been very reassuring to know that many of you have been well pleased and satisfied with my work and it is always very humbling when you return for assistance on other matters.

I am thoroughly enjoying my training here because this firm is unlike any other high street firm you could encounter. GHS is so unique: from our quaint Victorian house to the wonderful individuals you’ll find inside. There is always something to look forward to, whether it is another outrageously fabulous event or pushing to achieve the best possible outcome for our clients. Once again I find myself excited for what this next year holds I know will be another adventure.  I am looking forward to this next chapter and to meeting new clients and helping them with Family and Employment law matters. My hope, going forward, is that this year will be just as fun and successful as the last, if not more! 


A big thank you to my clients and to every single person who has made this past year truly remarkable, I couldn’t keep going without you. 

If you need any assistance with any aspect of Family or Employment Law, please call me on 01992 422 128 or email me here

Garden House Solicitors specialists in Employment Law Family Law Hertford Hertfordshire

www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.ukinfo@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 7 August 2017

Avoiding pains when changing names

Monosyllabic. Double barrelled. Triple barrelled. Your name and its use forms one of the most important and repeatedly laboured designations for the entire span of your life. Many of us lucky enough to have names suited to our location and situation never even consider the possibility of changing names, never mind actually attempting to enter the arena of ‘deed polls’, mysterious documents that many banish to the world of actors and victims of stalking. But there are many normal instances where people may wish to change either their own, or their child’s name; the paperwork should not be considered insurmountable. Whether it be for the benefit of settling into a new territory, entering a new profession (sometimes requiring the divorce from a parent’s ill-conceived eccentricity), the breakdown of a family, perhaps even just the individual choice of a child/adult. A brief discussion of the law and administration of deed polls will follow below.

Article by Yeung-way Hedges
An important feature of statute law, perhaps described more aptly as a ‘non-existent’ feature of statute law would be the omission of legislation in existence which hinders your human right to change your forename or surname. Conventions (Coke on Littleton 1628, Bracton c.1235) only prescribe that individuals must have and be referred to by a forename and surname in terms of legal existence, and common law (Barlow v Bateman 1730) actually provides precedent to support an individual’s right to freely change their name without the bondage of acts of Parliament. These freedoms are complicated however by specific factors affecting each situation independently, especially when issues such as age, parentage, and best interests of the individual come into the fold.

Wishes to change names via the deed poll process most commonly arise when a child’s home/family situation becomes complex. Parental responsibility (being legally recognised as the child’s parent, at birth for the mother and being married to the mother/named on the birth certificate for the father) operates in full force until the child reaches the age of consent (16 in England and Wales). Until the 16th birthday, in order to change a child’s name via deed poll, all responsible parents must provide consent for the process to take place. Once the child reaches the age of 16, the courts will grant them full power to do with their name what they wish; consent of parents is officially dissolved.

For younger children embroiled in the battles of parental disputes, the process of name changing becomes far more convoluted. For a parent with sole parental responsibility, no consent from the other (biological) parent would be required. But this situation proves rare in reality. Where a mother may wish to change her child’s surname to her own due to the breakdown of a relationship, she may find the courts unsympathetic where the father remains in contact and provides maintenance payments, especially if the child is under the age of 5. The courts identify the best interests of the child, especially in protecting a paternal bond, sometimes even where the father may be absent. Upon the age of 11, the courts will begin to take the child’s wishes into account, and by 14 the child’s wish becomes paramount, therefore the ability and flexibility in changing names grows alongside the child. In contrast, changing a child’s forename proves far easier, as it does not upset the biological bond between child and parent.

In 2013 The Guardian reported that ‘nearly 50,000 people a year are wasting millions of pounds paying online companies that promise on Google adverts to “officially change your name”’. The use of certain spurious online companies has resulted in consumers paying for ostensibly ‘official’ deed poll documents when in reality they hold no legal power, therefore to be sure of authenticity it is vital to seek the professional advice of a solicitor.


If you are considering changing your own or your child’s name and require advice and/or authentic legally binding services, please feel free to contact us via email or connect with us on LinkedIn. Our fixed fee for a single
Deed Poll is £75 plus VAT, incl. 3x certified copies of the deed. Any additional copies are charged at £3 each.



Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Friday, 28 July 2017

Boundary Battles

Are you an Anti-Social Neighbour?


If you have tall hedges lining your garden which block out light to your neighbour’s garden or main areas of their house, then a claim may be made against you for adversely affecting the reasonable enjoyment of a domestic property.

The Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003 makes it possible to bring a claim against a neighbour if their hedge is too high. Although there are generally no legal restrictions regarding the height of a hedge, the 2003 Act as well as the High Hedges (Appeals) (England) Regulations 2005 give local Councils powers to deal with complaints regarding the heights of hedges. Common law rights also exist allowing neighbours to cut overhanging branches from hedges or trees back to the boundary line separating two properties (provided no other legal restrictions apply.)
Garden House Solicitors, Dispute Resolution
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri

So, if your hedges are more than two metres tall and are formed wholly or predominantly by a line of two or more evergreens, a complaint can be made against you pursuant to the Anti-Social Behaviour Act. These rules are in place and can be enforced to ensure that there is no significant loss of light or daylight to a neighbour’s garden or home.

There are various calculations that can be used to determine an “actionable” hedge height (i.e. whether the height of the offending hedge is a legitimate cause of loss of light or daylight to a neighbouring house or garden.) However, it is the local council who generally determines whether the complaint is actionable. Therefore, the council are permitted to charge for their services and may reject a claim if they believe it to be frivolous or vexatious, or if they are not satisfied that attempts haven been made to resolve the matter by alternative amicable means. It is for this reason why any costs that arise in association with the council’s service are borne by the complainant.

The council’s role is to determine whether or not the hedge in question is adversely affecting the use and enjoyment of the neighbour’s property. Their role is adjudicative and they are able to impose remedial notices on the offending party, requiring them to take corrective action. Should a notice be ignored or incorrectly executed, then it may be enforced through criminal proceedings or carried out by the council themselves.


If you are having issues with your neighbour's shrubbery or are concerned that you may be liable for a claim, feel free to contact us via email or connect with us on LinkedIn.


Garden House Solicitors

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

Long Weekend Flight Delays

Bank Holiday Weekend plans were quickly disrupted for many passengers travelling from either Heathrow or Gatwick on British Airways. Thousands of travellers had their flights delayed or cancelled following a massive IT failure on Saturday 27 May 2017. Today (30 May 2017) the airline has finally been able to resolve its issues, but unfortunately this has come at a high price for many passengers. Those who were lucky enough to have their flights rescheduled arrived at their destination after lengthy delays and some further inconvenienced by a lack of baggage.

Garden House Solicitors
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
BA has set up a compensation scheme whereby passengers who required accommodation as a result of delays can reclaim the money spent on hotel stays, transfers and on food and refreshments. Reimbursements have been capped at the following rates:
  •  Up to £200 a day for hotel stays (based on 2 people sharing)
  •  Up to £50 for taxi transfers between the airport and the hotels
  •  Up to £25 per person per day for food and refreshments  

Additionally, passengers could receive up to £540 in compensation for the inconvenience caused, depending on the type of flight that was cancelled. Some may be happy to receive any form of compensation, but is this enough considering the costs of flights and the nature of consequences faced by individual customers whose flights were affected? It is also unclear whether additional inconveniences caused from missed or rebooked flights will be compensated under this scheme. Although the airline have said that they will honour any claim for compensation, this is neither guaranteed nor will compensation be automatic. You must formally apply for compensation and don’t forget that EU compensation rules may apply.

You may recall from an earlier article that the EU rules are as follows:
  • Short-haul flights must be delayed by at least 2 hours
  • Medium-haul flights must be delayed by at least 3 hours, and by 4 hours for long-haul flights
  • Accommodation and transfers must be provided for overnight delays
  • Full refunds are to be given (within 7 days) for cancellations, OR re-bookings must be made for flights cancelled at short notice
  • Passengers may receive cancellation compensation, the value of which is determined by the length of the fight
  • Passengers may receive further compensation for reaching their destination more than 3 hours later, the value of which is determined by the length of the flight and the delay
  • Compensation will only be provided for flights departing from or arriving in EU airports, as well as Norway, Switzerland or Iceland  

flightdelayspecialists
An internet photograph of delayed passengers


UK laws also state that compensation should be awarded where delays have been caused as a result technical faults, which clearly appears to be the case where BA is concerned. It is also one of BA’s policies that compensation claims can be brought for any qualifying flight delays or cancellation that have arisen within 6 years of the incident.


If you would like to speak to someone about what may be done to help you regarding delayed or cancelled flights, contact me via email or through LinkedIn to find out whether you may be owed compensation.

Garden House Solicitors 23 London Road Hertford SG13 7LG

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

Dementia Tax, what can be done about it?

Those with close family members faced with the prospect of requiring domiciliary or residential care, by now, should be well aware of the changes that will affect social care policy. The proposed manifesto will see our vulnerable having to pay for their own care fees if the combined total of their savings and property exceeds £100,000. Granted this raises care fee assessments from £23,250 but, with all things considered is this truly a saving when most assets are tied up in properties anyway? With the housing market as it is today, most people who own their own property will be tasked with paying for their own care fees should the need for care arise. Of course payment can be deferred until death, in which case the deceased’s estate would incur the burden of payment, meaning that leaving a healthy inheritance for the family may soon become a thing of the past. 
Kagowa Kuruneri - Garden House Solicitors
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri

Where domiciliary care was not an issue, its successor ensures that certain degenerative and debilitating diseases will attract care fee obligations and others will not, regardless of where care is provided. Does the discrimination between illnesses, geography and means serve any real benefit when the aim is to make care policies fairer?

The worry now is that in order to protect one’s assets or estate, those in need will shy away from much needed assistance until their circumstances are so dire that they require nursing care under the NHS. The other solution would appear to be transferring ownership of assets before care applications are submitted. However, setting aside the fact that it is unclear how such transfers will be treated under the new policy, there are Inheritance Tax provisions that could adversely affect your estate if certain conditions are not satisfied.


At best it is not yet clear whether there will be a way to receive care assistance without losing your property, diminishing the value of your estate, or putting your own health at more risk. However, if you would like to explore the options that are available which would reduce the blow delivered by the “Dementia tax” reach out to Garden House Solicitors today via email or LinkedIn.

Garden House Solicitors
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 23 January 2017

Things to consider when preparing Powers of Attorney


It is always advisable to prepare a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) because you can never be certain of what the future will bring. An LPA allows you to give someone you trust the legal authority to make decisions on your behalf should you not have the mental capacity to make these decisions on your own, or if you do not want to make certain decisions. For these reasons it is very important that your choice of attorney(s) is a decision made wisely.

What to think about when selecting your attorneys

Kagowa Kuruneri Trainee Solicitor Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
Spouses and other family members cannot just walk into the bank and access your accounts, even if it is to pay for your care. Without an LPA in place your relatives will have to apply to the court to be given authority to help you in this way, and this can be a long and costly process. 

Depending on the type of LPA you make, your attorney will have the power to make decisions such as where you live and whether or not you should receive or stop receiving a particular health care treatment. If your attorney is managing your affairs they will have the authority to write cheques in your name, sell or rent your property and even carry out your trade or business. Additionally, they will be able to conduct legal matters on your behalf.

Because of the power and responsibilities your attorney will have it is important that you consider the following:

  • Bearing in mind their own lives and obligations, is your attorney guaranteed to be able to take on, and manage, the responsibility you will be giving them? How well do they look after their own affairs? 
  • Think about the type of LPA you are creating, does your attorney have any relevant background or knowledge that will assist them in making those decisions on your behalf?
  • Can your attorney act alone or would it be better to have two or more people working with them to ensure that all decisions made on your behalf have been thought through with the time, care and consideration required?
  • Can your attorney be trusted to act in your best interests, setting aside all personal feelings and emotions? 
  • How well do you know your attorney? Would you still be comfortable with them making decisions on your behalf regardless of how circumstances and relationships change as time goes by?
  • Do you trust your attorney implicitly?

Remember, even though an LPA can be revoked, you have to be deemed to have the mental capacity to be able to make the revocation.

What to think about when selecting your certificate provider

In order to have your LPA registered, you will also need to have a reliable certificate provider. This is a person who can serve as a witness for your LPA and should be able to prove that at the time of preparing your LPA you did so on your own volition and that you understood the nature, purpose and scope of the authority you have granted. Your certificate provider should be able to act independently and possess the professional skills and expertise to provide your certificate. 

Garden House Solicitors specialise in drafting Lasting Powers of Attorney and are happy to assist you with any of your needs or concerns. To arrange an appointment, telephone me on 01992 422 128 or email me at Kagowa@GHSLaw.co.uk.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Specialists in powers of attorneys

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Things to Know About Coroner's Inquests

Garden House Solicitors
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
A Coroner’s inquest is held when a coroner receives notice that a person in their area has died under circumstances where the death was violent or unnatural; the cause of death is unknown; or the deceased was in the custody of the state. An inquest can be triggered when reports of a death have been made by the hospital, a doctor (where the deceased was a patient for less than 24 hours), care home representatives or by a family member.
An inquest is conducted pursuant to an individual’s right to life enshrined in the Human Rights Act 1998. Therefore, the State is obligated to investigate the circumstances of a person’s death in order to lay rest to any rumours or suspicion that may arise, or to learn from past tragedies. The Coroner’s investigation must be commenced in an open court and cases to be heard must be publicised. Conducting this court proceeding publicly ensures that the rights of those involved in the inquest are protected under open justice.
An inquest is used to determine who the deceased was; how they came to their death; when they came to their death and where they came to their death. The Coroner’s determination falls into one of 9 categories:
-         - Accident or misadventure                                   - Industrial disease
-         - Alcohol or drug related death                             - Natural causes
-         - Lawful or unlawful killing                                     - Open
-         - Road traffic collision                                            - Suicide
-         - Stillbirth
Where an open conclusion has been reached this means that even on a balance of probabilities, the evidence surrounding a death is insufficient to disclose or determine the cause of death. In some circumstances this is the case when suicide is suspected but it cannot be confirmed whether or not the deceased intended to take their own life at the time.
Prior to starting an investigation the Coroner must make whatever enquiries are necessary to decide if further investigation is required. This takes the form of a post-mortem examination of the body. If the post-mortem reveals that death was natural, e.g. from a heart attack or a ruptured aneurysm, then the Coroner is required to abandon the investigation.
An interested party is a person who qualifies to be informed of the date, time and place of an inquest. These include a spouse or civil partner, family members including step-parents and half siblings, a personal representative of the deceased, medical examiners, insurers, beneficiaries to the deceased’s insurance, and trade union representatives. An interested party also includes any person who by act or omission contributed to the deceased’s death, or whose employee may have done so.
Newspapers tend to watch the Coroner's website and pick up on cases that are interesting and sometimes sensationalise them. Although most of what is recorded by the Coroner is available to the public, interested parties may appeal to the editor not to print certain information. The Coroner also has discretionary power to decide how much is written in their reports and whether or not to verbally disclose it in open court.


If you would like to know more about a Coroner’s inquest, or if you are an interested party in need of assistance, please contact us via email or LinkedIn.


Garden House Solicitors
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Thursday, 8 December 2016

Landlords to face criminal sanctions in amended Right-to-Rent legislation

Kagowa Kuruneri of Garden House Solicitors, Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri

Since February 1st, 2016 Landlords across England have been obligated to ensure that tenants have a right to rent. Failure to fulfill this obligation meant that landlords could face a fine of up to £3,000 per tenant. However as of December 1st 2016, and under the Immigration Act 2016, landlords, their managing agents, and occupants who sub-let all or part of their accommodation could now face up to 5 years in prison for failing to verify a tenant’s right to rent.

In order to comply with the Right-to-Rent scheme, landlords must:
  • Establish that a tenants immigration status meets the requirement to rent a property;
  • Verify that the tenant’s immigration documents meet the requirement of those listed under the Right-to-Right scheme;
  • In the presence of the tenant, check that the documents provided are genuine;
  • Interview the tenant and make reasonable inquiries about who else will be staying at the property;
  • Ascertain whether the tenant has a time-limited or continuous right to rent;
  • Copy all documents and retain them in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998;
  • Notify the Home Office if the tenant’s circumstances change; and
  • Conduct follow-up checks when the tenant’s right to right expires or if there is a new tenancy agreement 
These requirements apply to all new tenants aged 18 and above. It is against the law to only assess tenants you believe are not British citizens. Checks must be made against all tenants regardless of whether or not: there is a legitimate agreement in place; the tenant is named in the agreement; or the agreement is in writing. These conditions also extend to tenants or lodgers who are only permitted limited stay in the UK. In these circumstances checks must be conducted by Landlords 28 days before the start of tenancy. Periodic follow-up checks may also be required thereafter.

Tenants who have had, or who receive Section 8 notices will now have a technical defense in possession proceedings if landlords or their managing agents issue these notices without specifically referring to the right-to-rent scheme under the Immigration Act 2016.

There are some types of accommodation that are exempt from this scheme. To find out more, or if you or anyone you know requires help in this regard please email me or get in touch with us on LinkedIn.

Garden House Solicitors

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Wednesday, 30 November 2016

Flight Delay Compensation

Airport disruptions can go a long way in ruining your holiday, travel plans or making a long trip home even longer. While some airlines make amends for the inconvenience caused, others seem to let the chips lie where they fall. Interference with your bookings caused by the airline constitutes as a breach of the contract between you and the airline. Therefore, if an airline is responsible for disruptions to your journey they should provide some reparation.

Under the current regime EU regulation EC 261/2004 applies to all passengers travelling on a UK or European airline, either departing from or arriving to the UK, an EU member state, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland. However, it should be noted that while there are guidelines in place, carriers interact with it differently so actual airline policies may vary.

You will be entitled to compensation if your flight has been delayed for 3 hours, or more, and the delay has been caused by the airline, e.g. due to a technical fault or overbooking. The amount of compensation received is determined by the length of the delay and the distance of the affected route. If you are delayed by less than 3 hours then you are not entitled to compensation. Nonetheless, the airline may issue food and drink vouchers and provide airport accommodation if delays continue overnight. 

Kagowa Kuruneri of Garden House Solicitors, Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
If a flight has been delayed for over 5 hours you are not obligated to take a replacement flight. You may instead request a full refund (including refunds for connecting flights that are part of your booking with the airline). If you choose not to take a new flight you are entitled to be provided with an airline voucher for food and drink, access to phone calls and emails, as well as airport accommodation (with transfers) if you are delayed overnight. If you decide to wait for a replacement flight you are further entitled to some compensation if, as above, the delay is caused by the airline. 

You also have a right to a full refund if your flight has been cancelled. This includes a refund for any connecting flights from the airline that are part of your booking. If you do not receive a refund you are entitled to a replacement flight to your destination. If the replacement flight delays you by 2 or more hours, you are further entitled to some compensation, vouchers for food and drink, access to phone calls and emails, as well as airport accommodation (with transfers) if delays persist overnight.

So the next time you book your holiday away remember that all will not be lost if your travels are disrupted by delays or cancellations. Contact the airline operating your flight and keep your flight details and booking references safely with you. Always bear in mind that while compensation is available, you will never receive compensation if flights are disrupted due to bad weather or strikes. 

If your flight is not protected by EU law you should contact the airline company directly as their own terms and conditions may include cancellation compensation. If you believe that you are entitled to compensation and require assistance with your claim, please feel free to email me or connect with us on LinkedIn.


Garden House Solicitors - contract and dispute resolution specialists

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 28 November 2016

Consumer Rights - "Black Friday"

Between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, who is looking out for you?  

With pay-day on the horizon and Christmas ever near, "Black Friday" gets many shoppers excited, and taken care of just in time for the festive break.  

Traditionally an American practice, Black Friday lasts one day with Cyber Monday being its online counterpart. The UK has continued this extravaganza with some added flare as this year stores across the country have enticed consumers with deals up to two weeks in advance of the event - and let's not forget the weekend long extension.   

From household goods and electronics, to holidays and the latest trends in fashion and cosmetics, there is something on the sale rack for everyone. No one is safe from the impulse to spend as visually we are bombarded with adverts of must-have products and the reminder that "Sale Ends Midnight." Some retailers have gone as far as stocking products solely for this event. So what's the catch? Faulty products and restrictions on refunds and returns.  

For those who shop in store and either try or inspect goods before taking them home, this isn't too much of a problem. But, what happens when damage and defects present themselves after the fact? And what can you do when you've chosen to forgo the crowds and congestion by shopping online? 

Kagowa Kuruneri of Garden House Solicitors, Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
As a customer you are protected by the Consumer Rights Acts 2015 (CRA). This Act entitles you to return products that are not as advertised. Your rights under this Act are simple, all goods bought either from shops or online must: 

  • Be fit for purpose 
  • Be of a satisfactory quality and standard; and  
  • Be as described, matching any models seen or examined.  

If your purchases do not meet the above criteria, or cause you any injury in any way, you are entitle for a refund, replacement or repair. Whether you've bought your goods online or in-store you have a grace period in which returns can be made (usually 7 - 14 days from the day you receive your items.) It is your right to return unsatisfactory products, no matter what bargains seduced you. You also have a right to cancel orders made online.  

That being said, online shoppers beware! There are some purchases that cannot be undone. Certain items that come specially sealed cannot be returned or refunded if their seals have been broken (e.g. CDs, video games or software.) Similarly, intimate items such as underwear and earrings cannot be returned for hygienic reasons, nor can you return items made to personalised specifications.   

So as you participate in the mad dash that Cyber Monday brings, exercise caution and shop smart. Keep your receipts and pay attention to the fine print. Before you check-out, read the returns policy and information about your right to cancel orders. If you are concerned about a recent purchase, believe you have a claim against merchants or manufacturers, or feel that you would like some legal advice regarding your consumer rights, we at Garden House Solicitors are looking out for you.

Email me, or connect with me on LinkedIn
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Tuesday, 26 July 2016

Personal injury claims and insurance companies.

Garden House Solicitors regularly receives instructions from accident victims who are dissatisfied with the service that they have received from another firm of solicitors.  The most frequent complaints are that they have never met face to face with the person handling their claim and that the medical evidence obtained by that solicitor is not correct.
 
Accident victims are often in need of rehabilitation and if your solicitor does not see you face to face it is not always apparent what help you need.  At Garden House we see every one of our clients face to face and their rehabilitation is one of the most important aspects of our work.  We also ensure that we instruct eminent experts to examine our clients and prepare expert medical reports.

Monday, 18 July 2016

Garden Party 2016


Garden House Solicitors held its 6th annual Garden Party on Friday 1 July 2016 to raise funds for the Alzheimer’s Society. We are pleased to announce that the event was a huge success and we raised £2,400 for the charity.

Garden House Solicitors - Hertford Lunch and refreshments were provided at the Garden House as well as a raffle prize draw. We would like to thank all the local people and businesses who kindly donated raffle prizes and vouchers. Kaya Halil on behalf of Barclays Bank in Hertford boosted the fundraiser by nominating the Alzheimer's Society as their charity of the year. The money raised will help them to continue supporting individuals suffering from dementia and their families.


Garden House Solicitors - Hertford




www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 13 June 2016

Biometric Passports



New rule changes on the 1st April 2016 require individuals to have a British Passport which is biometric, when visiting some countries abroad.

What is a biometric passport?
This is a passport which has an electronic chip containing your personal details.

Do I have a biometric passport?
If your passport was issued prior to 2007, then you may or may not have a biometric passport. This will be evident if there is a small logo located at the bottom of your passport.  Passports issued after 2007 should be biometric. You should ensure your passport is biometric before travelling, otherwise you may be turned away.

If you are travelling on a holiday, visiting friends and family or you are making a visa application, Garden House Solicitors are able to assist. We specialise in the following areas of Immigration Law:
Uzma Saleem of Garden House Solicitors in Hertfordshire
' Article by Uzma Saleem'
  • Applications for Indefinite leave to remain
  • Applications for further leave to remain
  • Asylum
  • Discretionary Leave
  • Nationality
  • Travel ID

Our services include fixed fees for standard applications and an initial consultation fee of £75.00 plus VAT.

If you require advice in relation to an immigration matter, then please call for an initial consultation. Please contact me on 01992 422128 or email uzma@ghslaw.co.uk

Follow me on 'Twitter' and connect with me on 'LinkedIn'.

Garden House Solicitors, Immigration Solicitors




www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Thursday, 2 June 2016

Manual handling at work and risk assessments


All employers must comply with the risk assessment requirements set out in the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992. These regulations require employers to apply control measures to prevent or reduce the risk of injury to their employees from manual handling. Manual handling relates to the moving of items either by lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing or pulling.

Assessing and reducing the risk of injury

Nazmin Chowdhury of Garden House Solicitors
Article by Nazmin Chowdhury
Risks can be found in all work sectors and employers will be asked by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to provide copies of all risk assessments carried out. This will then be assessed by a safety representative to ensure that the employer is preventing and controlling hazards. If a safety representative thinks that there is a risk of injury then under Regulation 4 the employer must take reasonable steps to reduce the risk by: 
  • Avoiding hazardous manual handling operations so far as is reasonably practicable
  • Making a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risk of injury from any hazardous manual handling operations that cannot be avoided
  • Reducing the risk of injury from those operations so far as is reasonably practicable 
  • Avoiding hazardous manual handling operations so far as is reasonably practicable.
  • Making a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risk of injury from any hazardous manual handling operations that cannot be avoided.

  • Reducing the risk of injury from those operations so far as is reasonably practicable.

Wednesday, 1 June 2016

Immigration Health Surcharge Fees



The Home Office introduced changes to fees accompanying immigration applications in April 2015. One of the changes introduced was for the payment of an Immigration Health Surcharge fee.

What is an Immigration Health Surcharge fee?
This is a fee paid by individuals entering the UK towards the NHS.

When is an Immigration Health Surcharge fee payable?
If you are applying for a visa application outside of the
Uzma Saleem of Garden House Solicitors in Hertfordshire
' Article by Uzma Saleem'
UK you will have to pay for an immigration health surcharge payment if:

  • Your applying for a visa for the purposes of studying, work or joining family in the UK for longer than a period of 6 months
  • You are a national of a country outside of the EEA (European Economic Area)

If you are making an application within the UK, you’ll have to pay if: 

  • The application is for any length of time (which includes those for 6 months or less) 
  • You are a national of a country outside of the EEA 

Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Immigration fee changes

If you are looking to submit an immigration application to the Home Office, whether this is as an individual or a family member, you will need to ensure that your application is accompanied by the correct fee.

The government set out proposed fee changes for Immigration which came into effect on the 18th March 2016. Under the new changes there is an increase to the fees charged for applications submitted to the Home office.

The main changes to the fees include;

·         An increase to visit, study and work visas
·         An increase to settlement, residence and nationality applications
·         An increase to premium services

If you are submitting an application to the Home Office, it is crucial that you speak with an individual who is able to advise you on the appropriate application and accompanying fee.

At Garden House Solicitors we offer services in the following areas of Immigration Law;
Article by Uzma Saleem

·         Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK
·         Further Leave to Remain in the UK
·         Asylum
·         Discretionary leave
·         Nationality

·         Travel ID

We provide a cost efficient and feasible service to all individuals. We provide fixed fees for standard applications and an initial consultation fee of £75.00 plus VAT.

Please call for an initial consultation. Please contact me on 01992 422 128 or email uzma@ghslaw.co.uk

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Garden House Solicitors - Immigration Law Specialists





www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.