Monday, 23 January 2017

Things to consider when preparing Powers of Attorney


It is always advisable to prepare a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) because you can never be certain of what the future will bring. An LPA allows you to give someone you trust the legal authority to make decisions on your behalf should you not have the mental capacity to make these decisions on your own, or if you do not want to make certain decisions. For these reasons it is very important that your choice of attorney(s) is a decision made wisely.

What to think about when selecting your attorneys

Kagowa Kuruneri Trainee Solicitor Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
Spouses and other family members cannot just walk into the bank and access your accounts, even if it is to pay for your care. Without an LPA in place your relatives will have to apply to the court to be given authority to help you in this way, and this can be a long and costly process. 

Depending on the type of LPA you make, your attorney will have the power to make decisions such as where you live and whether or not you should receive or stop receiving a particular health care treatment. If your attorney is managing your affairs they will have the authority to write cheques in your name, sell or rent your property and even carry out your trade or business. Additionally, they will be able to conduct legal matters on your behalf.

Because of the power and responsibilities your attorney will have it is important that you consider the following:

  • Bearing in mind their own lives and obligations, is your attorney guaranteed to be able to take on, and manage, the responsibility you will be giving them? How well do they look after their own affairs? 
  • Think about the type of LPA you are creating, does your attorney have any relevant background or knowledge that will assist them in making those decisions on your behalf?
  • Can your attorney act alone or would it be better to have two or more people working with them to ensure that all decisions made on your behalf have been thought through with the time, care and consideration required?
  • Can your attorney be trusted to act in your best interests, setting aside all personal feelings and emotions? 
  • How well do you know your attorney? Would you still be comfortable with them making decisions on your behalf regardless of how circumstances and relationships change as time goes by?
  • Do you trust your attorney implicitly?

Remember, even though an LPA can be revoked, you have to be deemed to have the mental capacity to be able to make the revocation.

What to think about when selecting your certificate provider

In order to have your LPA registered, you will also need to have a reliable certificate provider. This is a person who can serve as a witness for your LPA and should be able to prove that at the time of preparing your LPA you did so on your own volition and that you understood the nature, purpose and scope of the authority you have granted. Your certificate provider should be able to act independently and possess the professional skills and expertise to provide your certificate. 

Garden House Solicitors specialise in drafting Lasting Powers of Attorney and are happy to assist you with any of your needs or concerns. To arrange an appointment, telephone me on 01992 422 128 or email me at Kagowa@GHSLaw.co.uk.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Specialists in powers of attorneys

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Things to Know About Coroner's Inquests

Garden House Solicitors
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
A Coroner’s inquest is held when a coroner receives notice that a person in their area has died under circumstances where the death was violent or unnatural; the cause of death is unknown; or the deceased was in the custody of the state. An inquest can be triggered when reports of a death have been made by the hospital, a doctor (where the deceased was a patient for less than 24 hours), care home representatives or by a family member.
An inquest is conducted pursuant to an individual’s right to life enshrined in the Human Rights Act 1998. Therefore, the State is obligated to investigate the circumstances of a person’s death in order to lay rest to any rumours or suspicion that may arise, or to learn from past tragedies. The Coroner’s investigation must be commenced in an open court and cases to be heard must be publicised. Conducting this court proceeding publicly ensures that the rights of those involved in the inquest are protected under open justice.
An inquest is used to determine who the deceased was; how they came to their death; when they came to their death and where they came to their death. The Coroner’s determination falls into one of 9 categories:
-         - Accident or misadventure                                   - Industrial disease
-         - Alcohol or drug related death                             - Natural causes
-         - Lawful or unlawful killing                                     - Open
-         - Road traffic collision                                            - Suicide
-         - Stillbirth
Where an open conclusion has been reached this means that even on a balance of probabilities, the evidence surrounding a death is insufficient to disclose or determine the cause of death. In some circumstances this is the case when suicide is suspected but it cannot be confirmed whether or not the deceased intended to take their own life at the time.
Prior to starting an investigation the Coroner must make whatever enquiries are necessary to decide if further investigation is required. This takes the form of a post-mortem examination of the body. If the post-mortem reveals that death was natural, e.g. from a heart attack or a ruptured aneurysm, then the Coroner is required to abandon the investigation.
An interested party is a person who qualifies to be informed of the date, time and place of an inquest. These include a spouse or civil partner, family members including step-parents and half siblings, a personal representative of the deceased, medical examiners, insurers, beneficiaries to the deceased’s insurance, and trade union representatives. An interested party also includes any person who by act or omission contributed to the deceased’s death, or whose employee may have done so.
Newspapers tend to watch the Coroner's website and pick up on cases that are interesting and sometimes sensationalise them. Although most of what is recorded by the Coroner is available to the public, interested parties may appeal to the editor not to print certain information. The Coroner also has discretionary power to decide how much is written in their reports and whether or not to verbally disclose it in open court.


If you would like to know more about a Coroner’s inquest, or if you are an interested party in need of assistance, please contact us via email or LinkedIn.


Garden House Solicitors
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Thursday, 8 December 2016

Landlords to face criminal sanctions in amended Right-to-Rent legislation

Kagowa Kuruneri of Garden House Solicitors, Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri

Since February 1st, 2016 Landlords across England have been obligated to ensure that tenants have a right to rent. Failure to fulfill this obligation meant that landlords could face a fine of up to £3,000 per tenant. However as of December 1st 2016, and under the Immigration Act 2016, landlords, their managing agents, and occupants who sub-let all or part of their accommodation could now face up to 5 years in prison for failing to verify a tenant’s right to rent.

In order to comply with the Right-to-Rent scheme, landlords must:
  • Establish that a tenants immigration status meets the requirement to rent a property;
  • Verify that the tenant’s immigration documents meet the requirement of those listed under the Right-to-Right scheme;
  • In the presence of the tenant, check that the documents provided are genuine;
  • Interview the tenant and make reasonable inquiries about who else will be staying at the property;
  • Ascertain whether the tenant has a time-limited or continuous right to rent;
  • Copy all documents and retain them in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998;
  • Notify the Home Office if the tenant’s circumstances change; and
  • Conduct follow-up checks when the tenant’s right to right expires or if there is a new tenancy agreement 
These requirements apply to all new tenants aged 18 and above. It is against the law to only assess tenants you believe are not British citizens. Checks must be made against all tenants regardless of whether or not: there is a legitimate agreement in place; the tenant is named in the agreement; or the agreement is in writing. These conditions also extend to tenants or lodgers who are only permitted limited stay in the UK. In these circumstances checks must be conducted by Landlords 28 days before the start of tenancy. Periodic follow-up checks may also be required thereafter.

Tenants who have had, or who receive Section 8 notices will now have a technical defense in possession proceedings if landlords or their managing agents issue these notices without specifically referring to the right-to-rent scheme under the Immigration Act 2016.

There are some types of accommodation that are exempt from this scheme. To find out more, or if you or anyone you know requires help in this regard please email me or get in touch with us on LinkedIn.

Garden House Solicitors

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Wednesday, 30 November 2016

Flight Delay Compensation

Airport disruptions can go a long way in ruining your holiday, travel plans or making a long trip home even longer. While some airlines make amends for the inconvenience caused, others seem to let the chips lie where they fall. Interference with your bookings caused by the airline constitutes as a breach of the contract between you and the airline. Therefore, if an airline is responsible for disruptions to your journey they should provide some reparation.

Under the current regime EU regulation EC 261/2004 applies to all passengers travelling on a UK or European airline, either departing from or arriving to the UK, an EU member state, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland. However, it should be noted that while there are guidelines in place, carriers interact with it differently so actual airline policies may vary.

You will be entitled to compensation if your flight has been delayed for 3 hours, or more, and the delay has been caused by the airline, e.g. due to a technical fault or overbooking. The amount of compensation received is determined by the length of the delay and the distance of the affected route. If you are delayed by less than 3 hours then you are not entitled to compensation. Nonetheless, the airline may issue food and drink vouchers and provide airport accommodation if delays continue overnight. 

Kagowa Kuruneri of Garden House Solicitors, Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
If a flight has been delayed for over 5 hours you are not obligated to take a replacement flight. You may instead request a full refund (including refunds for connecting flights that are part of your booking with the airline). If you choose not to take a new flight you are entitled to be provided with an airline voucher for food and drink, access to phone calls and emails, as well as airport accommodation (with transfers) if you are delayed overnight. If you decide to wait for a replacement flight you are further entitled to some compensation if, as above, the delay is caused by the airline. 

You also have a right to a full refund if your flight has been cancelled. This includes a refund for any connecting flights from the airline that are part of your booking. If you do not receive a refund you are entitled to a replacement flight to your destination. If the replacement flight delays you by 2 or more hours, you are further entitled to some compensation, vouchers for food and drink, access to phone calls and emails, as well as airport accommodation (with transfers) if delays persist overnight.

So the next time you book your holiday away remember that all will not be lost if your travels are disrupted by delays or cancellations. Contact the airline operating your flight and keep your flight details and booking references safely with you. Always bear in mind that while compensation is available, you will never receive compensation if flights are disrupted due to bad weather or strikes. 

If your flight is not protected by EU law you should contact the airline company directly as their own terms and conditions may include cancellation compensation. If you believe that you are entitled to compensation and require assistance with your claim, please feel free to email me or connect with us on LinkedIn.


Garden House Solicitors - contract and dispute resolution specialists

Tel: 01992 422 128

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 28 November 2016

Consumer Rights - "Black Friday"

Between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, who is looking out for you?  

With pay-day on the horizon and Christmas ever near, "Black Friday" gets many shoppers excited, and taken care of just in time for the festive break.  

Traditionally an American practice, Black Friday lasts one day with Cyber Monday being its online counterpart. The UK has continued this extravaganza with some added flare as this year stores across the country have enticed consumers with deals up to two weeks in advance of the event - and let's not forget the weekend long extension.   

From household goods and electronics, to holidays and the latest trends in fashion and cosmetics, there is something on the sale rack for everyone. No one is safe from the impulse to spend as visually we are bombarded with adverts of must-have products and the reminder that "Sale Ends Midnight." Some retailers have gone as far as stocking products solely for this event. So what's the catch? Faulty products and restrictions on refunds and returns.  

For those who shop in store and either try or inspect goods before taking them home, this isn't too much of a problem. But, what happens when damage and defects present themselves after the fact? And what can you do when you've chosen to forgo the crowds and congestion by shopping online? 

Kagowa Kuruneri of Garden House Solicitors, Hertfordshire
Article by Kagowa Kuruneri
As a customer you are protected by the Consumer Rights Acts 2015 (CRA). This Act entitles you to return products that are not as advertised. Your rights under this Act are simple, all goods bought either from shops or online must: 

  • Be fit for purpose 
  • Be of a satisfactory quality and standard; and  
  • Be as described, matching any models seen or examined.  

If your purchases do not meet the above criteria, or cause you any injury in any way, you are entitle for a refund, replacement or repair. Whether you've bought your goods online or in-store you have a grace period in which returns can be made (usually 7 - 14 days from the day you receive your items.) It is your right to return unsatisfactory products, no matter what bargains seduced you. You also have a right to cancel orders made online.  

That being said, online shoppers beware! There are some purchases that cannot be undone. Certain items that come specially sealed cannot be returned or refunded if their seals have been broken (e.g. CDs, video games or software.) Similarly, intimate items such as underwear and earrings cannot be returned for hygienic reasons, nor can you return items made to personalised specifications.   

So as you participate in the mad dash that Cyber Monday brings, exercise caution and shop smart. Keep your receipts and pay attention to the fine print. Before you check-out, read the returns policy and information about your right to cancel orders. If you are concerned about a recent purchase, believe you have a claim against merchants or manufacturers, or feel that you would like some legal advice regarding your consumer rights, we at Garden House Solicitors are looking out for you.

Email me, or connect with me on LinkedIn
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Tuesday, 26 July 2016

Personal injury claims and insurance companies.

Garden House Solicitors regularly receives instructions from accident victims who are dissatisfied with the service that they have received from another firm of solicitors.  The most frequent complaints are that they have never met face to face with the person handling their claim and that the medical evidence obtained by that solicitor is not correct.
 
Accident victims are often in need of rehabilitation and if your solicitor does not see you face to face it is not always apparent what help you need.  At Garden House we see every one of our clients face to face and their rehabilitation is one of the most important aspects of our work.  We also ensure that we instruct eminent experts to examine our clients and prepare expert medical reports.

Monday, 18 July 2016

Garden Party 2016


Garden House Solicitors held its 6th annual Garden Party on Friday 1 July 2016 to raise funds for the Alzheimer’s Society. We are pleased to announce that the event was a huge success and we raised £2,400 for the charity.

Garden House Solicitors - Hertford Lunch and refreshments were provided at the Garden House as well as a raffle prize draw. We would like to thank all the local people and businesses who kindly donated raffle prizes and vouchers. Kaya Halil on behalf of Barclays Bank in Hertford boosted the fundraiser by nominating the Alzheimer's Society as their charity of the year. The money raised will help them to continue supporting individuals suffering from dementia and their families.


Garden House Solicitors - Hertford




www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 13 June 2016

Biometric Passports



New rule changes on the 1st April 2016 require individuals to have a British Passport which is biometric, when visiting some countries abroad.

What is a biometric passport?
This is a passport which has an electronic chip containing your personal details.

Do I have a biometric passport?
If your passport was issued prior to 2007, then you may or may not have a biometric passport. This will be evident if there is a small logo located at the bottom of your passport.  Passports issued after 2007 should be biometric. You should ensure your passport is biometric before travelling, otherwise you may be turned away.

If you are travelling on a holiday, visiting friends and family or you are making a visa application, Garden House Solicitors are able to assist. We specialise in the following areas of Immigration Law:
Uzma Saleem of Garden House Solicitors in Hertfordshire
' Article by Uzma Saleem'
  • Applications for Indefinite leave to remain
  • Applications for further leave to remain
  • Asylum
  • Discretionary Leave
  • Nationality
  • Travel ID

Our services include fixed fees for standard applications and an initial consultation fee of £75.00 plus VAT.

If you require advice in relation to an immigration matter, then please call for an initial consultation. Please contact me on 01992 422128 or email uzma@ghslaw.co.uk

Follow me on 'Twitter' and connect with me on 'LinkedIn'.

Garden House Solicitors, Immigration Solicitors




www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Thursday, 2 June 2016

Manual handling at work and risk assessments


All employers must comply with the risk assessment requirements set out in the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992. These regulations require employers to apply control measures to prevent or reduce the risk of injury to their employees from manual handling. Manual handling relates to the moving of items either by lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing or pulling.

Assessing and reducing the risk of injury

Nazmin Chowdhury of Garden House Solicitors
Article by Nazmin Chowdhury
Risks can be found in all work sectors and employers will be asked by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to provide copies of all risk assessments carried out. This will then be assessed by a safety representative to ensure that the employer is preventing and controlling hazards. If a safety representative thinks that there is a risk of injury then under Regulation 4 the employer must take reasonable steps to reduce the risk by: 
  • Avoiding hazardous manual handling operations so far as is reasonably practicable
  • Making a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risk of injury from any hazardous manual handling operations that cannot be avoided
  • Reducing the risk of injury from those operations so far as is reasonably practicable 
  • Avoiding hazardous manual handling operations so far as is reasonably practicable.
  • Making a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risk of injury from any hazardous manual handling operations that cannot be avoided.

  • Reducing the risk of injury from those operations so far as is reasonably practicable.

Wednesday, 1 June 2016

Immigration Health Surcharge Fees



The Home Office introduced changes to fees accompanying immigration applications in April 2015. One of the changes introduced was for the payment of an Immigration Health Surcharge fee.

What is an Immigration Health Surcharge fee?
This is a fee paid by individuals entering the UK towards the NHS.

When is an Immigration Health Surcharge fee payable?
If you are applying for a visa application outside of the
Uzma Saleem of Garden House Solicitors in Hertfordshire
' Article by Uzma Saleem'
UK you will have to pay for an immigration health surcharge payment if:

  • Your applying for a visa for the purposes of studying, work or joining family in the UK for longer than a period of 6 months
  • You are a national of a country outside of the EEA (European Economic Area)

If you are making an application within the UK, you’ll have to pay if: 

  • The application is for any length of time (which includes those for 6 months or less) 
  • You are a national of a country outside of the EEA 

Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Immigration fee changes

If you are looking to submit an immigration application to the Home Office, whether this is as an individual or a family member, you will need to ensure that your application is accompanied by the correct fee.

The government set out proposed fee changes for Immigration which came into effect on the 18th March 2016. Under the new changes there is an increase to the fees charged for applications submitted to the Home office.

The main changes to the fees include;

·         An increase to visit, study and work visas
·         An increase to settlement, residence and nationality applications
·         An increase to premium services

If you are submitting an application to the Home Office, it is crucial that you speak with an individual who is able to advise you on the appropriate application and accompanying fee.

At Garden House Solicitors we offer services in the following areas of Immigration Law;
Article by Uzma Saleem

·         Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK
·         Further Leave to Remain in the UK
·         Asylum
·         Discretionary leave
·         Nationality

·         Travel ID

We provide a cost efficient and feasible service to all individuals. We provide fixed fees for standard applications and an initial consultation fee of £75.00 plus VAT.

Please call for an initial consultation. Please contact me on 01992 422 128 or email uzma@ghslaw.co.uk

Follow me on 'Twitter' and connect with me on 'Linkedin'


Garden House Solicitors - Immigration Law Specialists





www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.


Thursday, 12 May 2016

What is the Data Protection Act 1998?


The Data Protection Act 1998 controls how your personal information is used by organisations, businesses or the government. It also give you the right to know what information is stored about you and how they can use it.

The Data Protection Principles

Under the Data Protection Act 1998, anyone who processes personal information must ensure that the information is:
  1. Fairly and lawfully processed
  2. Processed for limited purposes
  3. Adequate, relevant and not excessive
  4. Accurate
  5. Not kept for longer than is necessary
  6. Proceed in line with an individual's rights
  7. Secure
  8. Not transferred to other countries without adequate protection

How to find out what data an organisation has about you

The Data Protection Act 1998 gives you the right to know what information is stored about you and you can make a request in writing. This is known as a subject access request and a response must be given within 40 days of the request.

How much does it cost?

Some organisations may charge you for providing the information. The cost is usually no more than £10 and adequate proof of identity is required from the applicant before considering the request.

If you think your data has been misused or that the organisation holding it hasn’t been kept secure then contact Garden House Solicitors for further advice on 01992 422128. 

Follow us on Twitter                                                                  Connect with us on LinkedIn



Garden House Solicitors, Hertford - Data protection
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 25 April 2016

Registering to vote and the Electoral Roll


If you would like to take part in the EU Referendum on Thursday 23 June 2016, you will need to ensure that you are registered to vote. To vote in an election or referendum, you will need to be registered on the Electoral Roll. The Electoral Roll is a list of all the names and addresses of those registered to vote in the UK. Each local authority is in charge of the Electoral Roll in its own area and it is updated every month.

Who can register to vote?
  • You can register to vote if you are 17 years old. However, you can only vote when you become 18 years old. 
  • You must be a British or a qualifying Commonwealth citizen. 
·
Not all households are automatically registered to be able to vote in an election or referendum and therefore it is absolutely vital to ensure that you have signed up to the Electoral Roll. The information on the Electoral Roll must be correct especially if you are applying for credit as the lender will use this information to confirm if your name and address is correct when carrying out a credit check. If you have not registered to vote or the details on the Electoral Roll are incorrect then you may be refused credit.  

If you would like to find out if you are registered to vote on the Electoral Roll or would like to check your credit report please contact Garden House Solicitors on 01992 422128.

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Electoral Roll Garden House Solicitors
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Immigration law at Garden House Solicitors


Garden House Solicitors are proud to announce that they are now offering services in Immigration Law.

If you are looking for advice in respect of your immigration matter, it is important to consult an individual who is able to guide you through this process from start to finish.

What is Immigration Law?

Uzma Saleem of Garden House Solicitors
Article by Uzma Saleem
Immigration law refers to national government policies controlling the immigration and deportation of people, and addresses matters such as applications for individuals, including those for naturalization, citizenship, and settlement.

Some of the services we offer comprise of:                        
  • Applications for settlement
  • Indefinite leave to remain in the UK
  • Spousal Visas
  • Applications for extension of stay in the UK


Our services include fixed fees for standard applications and an initial consultation fee of £75.00 plus VAT.

If you require advice in relation to an immigration matter, then please call for an initial consultation. Please contact me on 01992 422 128 or email uzma@ghslaw.co.ukuzma@ghslaw.co.uk


Immigration law at Garden House Solicitors
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Friday, 8 April 2016

Microchipping made compulsory for all dogs



Nazmin Chowdhury of Graden House Solicitors
Article by Nazmin Chowdhury
From 6 April 2016, all dog owners must ensure their dogs are microchipped under the Microchipping of Dogs Regulations (2015). A microchip is a small electronic chip which is implanted under the dog’s skin and contains a unique number that can be read by a scanner.

The dog owner’s contact details relating to each number are logged on a central database and should the dog ever go missing or be stolen it can be scanned by the police or the local authority to make it easier for the dog to be returned to its owner. Therefore it is absolutely vital that the owner takes responsibility for updating their details with the database should their circumstances change. 

Microchipping of dogs hertfordIf the police or the local authority find a dog without a microchip, assuming that the owner of the dog in question can be located, the owner will be given a time limit of 21 days to get their dog microchipped. If they still fail to comply with the law, they will face a fine of up to £500 per dog.


If you have not already had your pet microchipped and would like to seek advice please contact me on 01992 422128 or email nazmin@ghslaw.co.uk

Please follow me on Twitter                   Connect with me on LinkedIn



Garden House Solicitors Hertford
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Monday, 4 April 2016

Garden House Solicitors awarded Law Society's Lexcel Accreditation


Garden House Solicitors are proud to announce that we have again been awarded the prestigious Lexcel Accreditation by the Law Society.

Lexcel Accreditation is a mark of quality awarded by the Law Society specifically developed for law firms who demonstrate and maintain the highest levels of service.  It is a recognised accreditation scheme for law firms which gives assurance to our clients that our practice meets high client care and business management standards.

Garden House Solicitors Hertford To gain and retain Lexcel Accreditation, firms must undergo a rigorous assessment process from an experienced, trained Lexcel assessor and we are absolutely delighted to announce that Garden House Solicitors has met the Lexcel V6 Practice Management Standard. 

Client care is paramount at Garden House Solicitors and we do our best to ensure that our clients are provided the highest level of service. As a Lexcel Accredited firm, we are always looking for ways to improve our client care service and one of the ways we do this is by asking our clients for their feedback and making any appropriate changes.

We are assessed annually by Lexcel to ensure that we are maintaining the same high standards and therefore we are proud to have received continued accreditation for the forthcoming year.

If you would like to discuss your legal issues with our Lexcel Accredited Solicitors please do not hesitate to contact us on 01992 422128.

Follow us on Twitter                                                    Connect with us on LinkedIn


Law Society Garden House Solicitors Hertford
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.

Tuesday, 29 March 2016

How to ensure your job interviews meet with legal requirements


Job interviews are an opportunity for employers to find out more about their candidates but there are some legalities around the process which you should be aware of before you begin the interview process.

Whilst the purpose of the interview is for you to determine if the candidate is suitable for the vacancy, there are laws to protect the interviewee from being asked unlawful questions that could possibly lead to a claim against your business.

Under the Equality Act 2010, it is unlawful for employers to discriminate against candidates based on their:
  • Age                                                             
  • Faith
  • Sexual orientation
  • Gender
  • Marital status
  • Pregnancy
You should ensure that you keep written notes taken during interviews so that you can prove why you selected one candidate over another. Applicants are legally entitled to request such notes and you are obliged to keep them for a year post interview.

If you would like advice about the recruitment process, need help with drafting a job description or an interview assessment template, please contact us on 01992 422128 to arrange an appointment. 

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Employment lawyers in Herford job interview
www.gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk

Tel: 01992 422 128

Email: info@gardenhousesolicitors.co.uk
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.